Encountering Christ Together

Welcome

Welcome to the

 

Heart of Jesus Area Faith Community

Heart of Jesus Area Faith Community

Welcome to the Heart of Jesus Area Faith Community consisting of four parish communities: Holy Redeemer Parish in Renville, St. Aloysius Parish in Olivia, St. Mary’s Parish in Bird Island, and St. John’s Parish in Hector, MN. Our four parishes are in the heart of the Diocese of New Ulm. As pastor of the four parishes I want to welcome you to our website and to our parishes. I invite you to come to one of our weekend Masses to worship with us. If you are new to the area and would like more information about any of our parishes, please contact one of our parishes.

Mass Times

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Tuesday, August 14th
5:30pm - St. Aloysius, Olivia
*7:00pm - St. John's, Hector
Wednesday, August 15th
9:00am - St. Mary, Bird Island
7:00pm - Holy Redeemer, Renville
*Please note that the 7:00pm Mass time is a change from what is listed in the bulletin. Mass at St. John's in Hector will be at 7pm.

Weekend Mass Schedule:
Saturday
4:00pm - St. Mary - Bird Island
5:00pm - St. Aloysius - Olivia
Sunday:
8:30am - St. Aloysius - Olivia
8:30am - St. John's - Hector
10:30am - St. Mary's - Bird Island
10:30am - Holy Redeemer - Renville

One Priest Weekends: September 22/23 & October 20/21
One Priest Weekend Schedule:
Saturday:
5:00pm - St. Aloysius - Olivia
7:00pm - St. John's - Hector
Sunday:
8:30am - Holy Redeemer - Renville
10:30am - St. Mary's - Bird Island

Reconciliation Times

Regular times schedule for the sacrament of reconciliation are:

  •  Holy Redeemer
    • Sunday - 10:00 – 10:20am
  • St. Aloysius
    • Sunday – 8:00 – 8:20am
    • Monday - 8:00 – 8:20am
    • Friday - 8:00 – 8:20am
    • Saturday – 4:30 – 4:50pm
  • St. Mary’s
    • Saturday – 11:00am
  • St. John’s
    • Sunday - 8:00 – 8:20am

Extra times are scheduled during Advent and Lent. Individual appointments may also be scheduled by calling the parish office.

Office Hours

St. John - Tue: 9:15am-11:30am
St. Mary - M- Th: 9am -4pm, F: 9am- 12pm (noon)
St. Aloysius - M- Th: 9am -4pm, F: 9am- 12pm (noon)
Holy Redeemer - Please contact St. Aloysius

New to our Area Faith Community

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Bulletin Text Issue

If you are having issues reading the bulletin please switch internet browsers.  We know that computers that have Window's 10 using the Edge Browser are experiencing issues with bulletins after June 10th.  The issue can be corrected by using another browser such as Google Chrome.  If you have questions, please contact the parish office.

Publications


  • Sun, Aug 19th

  • Sun, Aug 12th
Older Publications

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The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary - Mass Schedule

The Mass Schedule for the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary is as follows:

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Daylight Savings

Sunday, March 11th is Daylight Savings.  Make sure to adjust your clocks so you ... Read More »

Word On Fire

The McCarrick Mess

When I was going through school, the devil was presented to us as a myth, a literary device, a symbolic manner of signaling the presence of evil in the world. I will admit to internalizing this view and largely losing my sense of the devil as a real spiritual person. What shook my agnosticism in regard to the evil one was the clerical sex abuse scandal of the nineties and the early aughts. I say this because that awful crisis just seemed too thought-through, too well-coordinated, to be simply the result of chance or wicked human choice. The devil is characterized as “the enemy of the human race” and particularly the enemy of the Church. I challenge anyone to come up with a more devastatingly effective strategy for attacking the mystical body of Christ than the abuse of children and young people by priests. This sin had countless direct victims of course, but it also crippled the Church financially, undercut vocations, caused people to lose confidence in Christianity, dramatically compromised attempts at evangelization, etc., etc. It was a diabolical masterpiece.

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El Desastre McCarrick

Cuando estaba en la escuela, el diablo se nos presentaba como un mito, como un artificio literario, una manera simbólica para explicar la presencia del mal en el mundo. Admito haber asumido en gran medida esta visión y haber perdido de vista que el diablo es una persona espiritual real. Lo que sacudió mi escepticismo sobre el maligno fueron los escándalos sexuales del clero de los noventa y a principios del dos mil. Digo esto porque esta horrible crisis parecía demasiado bien pensada y coordinada como para ser el simple fruto del azar o de elecciones malvadas del hombre. El diablo ha sido caracterizado como “el enemigo de la raza humana” y particularmente como el enemigo de la Iglesia. Reto a cualquiera a idear una estrategia más devastadoramente efectiva para atacar al cuerpo místico de Cristo, que el abuso de niños y jóvenes por parte de sacerdotes. Esta claro que este pecado tiene incontables víctimas directas, pero también ha destruido las finanzas de la Iglesia, ha disminuido las vocaciones, conseguido que muchos pierdan su confianza en el cristianismo, comprometido dramáticamente los esfuerzos de evangelización, etc. Toda una obra maestra del diablo.

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Why Accompaniment Involves Apologetics

I recently granted an interview to the National Catholic Reporter concerning the upcoming Synod on Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment, to which I was elected a delegate. In the course of the conversation, I stated that I would bring the issue of apologetics before the Synod, since so many young people have questions about, and objections to, the faith. But when the interview appeared, the author expressed her puzzlement that I would mention apologetics, though it is clear that the working document calls for “accompaniment” of young people. It seems many think doing apologetics and accompaniment are mutually exclusive. To my mind, they’re mutually implicative.

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USCCB News

USCCB Committee on International Justice and Peace Chairman Issues Statement Following Visit to Nicaragua; Commits to Walking with the Bishops of Nicaragua “in the Service of Truth”

 WASHINGTON— Following a visit to Nicaragua last week, Archbishop

Timothy Broglio, Chairman of the U.S. Bishops' Conference Committee on

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President of U.S. Bishops' Conference Announces Effort That Will Involve Laity, Experts, and the Vatican as U.S. Bishops Resolve to Address "Moral Catastrophe"

WASHINGTON— Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), has issued the following statement after a series of meetings with members of the USCCB's Executive Committee and other bishops. The following statement includes three goals and three principles, along with initial steps of a plan that will involve laity, experts, and the Vatican. A more developed plan will be presented to the full body of bishops at their general assembly meeting in Baltimore in November.Cardinal DiNardo's full statement follows:"Brothers and Sisters in Christ,Two weeks ago, I shared with you my sadness, anger, and shame over the recent revelations concerning Archbishop Theodore McCarrick. Those sentiments continue and are deepened in light of the Pennsylvania Grand Jury report. We are faced with a spiritual crisis that requires not only spiritual conversion, but practical changes to avoid repeating the sins and failures of the past that are so evident in the recent report. Earlier this week, the USCCB Executive Committee met again and established an outline of these necessary changes.The Executive Committee has established three goals: (1) an investigation into the questions surrounding Archbishop McCarrick; (2) an opening of new and confidential channels for reporting complaints against bishops; and (3) advocacy for more effective resolution of future complaints. These goals will be pursued according to three criteria: proper independence, sufficient authority, and substantial leadership by laity.We have already begun to develop a concrete plan for accomplishing these goals, relying upon consultation with experts, laity, and clergy, as well as the Vatican. We will present this plan to the full body of bishops in our November meeting.  In addition, I will travel to Rome to present these goals and criteria to the Holy See, and to urge further concrete steps based on them.The overarching goal in all of this is stronger protections against predators in the Church and anyone who would conceal them, protections that will hold bishops to the highest standards of transparency and accountability.Allow me to briefly elaborate on the goals and criteria that we have identified.The first goal is a full investigation of questions surrounding Archbishop McCarrick. These answers are necessary to prevent a recurrence, and so help to protect minors, seminarians, and others who are vulnerable in the future. We will therefore invite the Vatican to conduct an Apostolic Visitation to address these questions, in concert with a group of predominantly lay people identified for their expertise by members of the National Review Board and empowered to act.The second goal is to make reporting of abuse and misconduct by bishops easier. Our 2002 "Statement of Episcopal Commitment" does not make clear what avenue victims themselves should follow in reporting abuse or other sexual misconduct by bishops. We need to update this document.  We also need to develop and widely promote reliable third-party reporting mechanisms. Such tools already exist in many dioceses and in the public sector and we are already examining specific options.The third goal is to advocate for better procedures to resolve complaints against bishops. For example, the canonical procedures that follow a complaint will be studied with an eye toward concrete proposals to make them more prompt, fair, and transparent and to specify what constraints may be imposed on bishops at each stage of that process. We will pursue these goals according to three criteria.The first criterion is genuine independence. Any mechanism for addressing any complaint against a bishop must be free from bias or undue influence by a bishop. Our structures must preclude bishops from deterring complaints against them, from hampering their investigation, or from skewing their resolution.The second criterion relates to authority in the Church. Because only the Pope has authority to discipline or remove bishops, we will assure that our measures will both respect that authority and protect the vulnerable from the abuse of ecclesial power.Our third criterion is substantial involvement of the laity. Lay people bring expertise in areas of investigation, law enforcement, psychology, and other relevant disciplines, and their presence reinforces our commitment to the first criterion of independence.Finally, I apologize and humbly ask your forgiveness for what my brother bishops and I have done and failed to do. Whatever the details may turn out to be regarding Archbishop McCarrick or the many abuses in Pennsylvania (or anywhere else), we already know that one root cause is the failure of episcopal leadership. The result was that scores of beloved children of God were abandoned to face an abuse of power alone. This is a moral catastrophe. It is also part of this catastrophe that so many faithful priests who are pursuing holiness and serving with integrity are tainted by this failure. We firmly resolve, with the help of God's grace, never to repeat it. I have no illusions about the degree to which trust in the bishops has been damaged by these past sins and failures. It will take work to rebuild that trust. What I have outlined here is only the beginning; other steps will follow. I will keep you informed of our progress toward these goals.Let me ask you to hold us to all of these resolutions. Let me also ask you to pray for us, that we will take this time to reflect, repent, and recommit ourselves to holiness of life and to conform our lives even more to Christ, the Good Shepherd."---Keywords: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Cardinal Daniel N. Dinardo, Executive Committee, clergy sex abuse, Pennsylvania, grand jury report, Archbishop Theodore McCarrick, laity, experts, Vatican, transparency, accountability.###Media Contact:Judy Keane202-541-3200WASHINGTON—

El Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo de Galveston-Houston, presidente de la

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President of U.S. Bishops' Conference and Committee Chairman Response to Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report

WASHINGTON—Cardinal

Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, is hosting a series of meetings this week responding to the broader

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